International Open Access Week is October 24-30 – MIT News Office

International Open Access Week is October 24-30 – MIT News Office.

MIT was the first institution to have a university-wide, faculty-driven open access policy, which was established in March 2009. Learn more about MIT’s efforts to promote open access in the video, MIT Faculty on Open Access. Professors Hal Abelson, Eric von Hippel, Richard Holton and JoAnne Yates speak about the scholarly publishing environment and the goals and impact of the Open Access Policy they helped put in place. Since the policy’s enactment, more than 4,000 articles by MIT authors have been added to the Open Access Articles Collection in DSpace@MIT, and the collection continues to grow.

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/international-open-access-week-celebration.html

Princeton bans academics from handing all copyright to journal publishers

Nothing like some awesome news to get me back to my blog:

I was forwarded this blog post by Budd Hall this morning:

It comes from The Conversation, an Australian initiative. Launched in March 2011, The Conversation is an independent source of information, analysis and commentary from the university and research sector.

“Prestigious US academic institution Princeton University has banned researchers from giving the copyright of scholarly articles to journal publishers, except in certain cases where a waiver may be granted.

The new rule is part of an Open Access policy aimed at broadening the reach of their scholarly work and encouraging publishers to adjust standard contracts that commonly require exclusive copyright as a condition of publication….”

… read the rest of The Conversation post and go to the Open Access Report at the Princeton University website to learn more about scholarly communication at Princeton.

Noam Chomsky spoke at UTSC on Academic Freedom and the Corporatization of Universities.

Noam Chomsky speaks at U Toronto Sc
On April 6, 2011, Noam Chomsky spoke at UTSC on Academic Freedom and the Corporatization of Universities.

Noam Chomsky is one of America’s leading scholars and intellectuals. A prolific author, lecturer, and activist, Chomsky is currently an Institute Professor in the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

His talk ought to be interesting to anyone interested in Open Access. The conflict between the Corporatization of Universities and those who value community engagement and Open Access to scholarship is striking and not to be ignored.

Did you know he is the most cited living scholar?

Watch it on Youtube here.

Open Access, Scopus and Going Green

The latest issue of the Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, (Jun2011, Vol. 62 Issue 6, p1130-1145) includes an article by Sandra Miguel, Zaida Chinchilla-Rodriguez, and Félix de Moya-Anegón: “Open Access and Scopus: A new approach to scientific visibility from the standpoint of access“.

Their study, titled ” Open Access and Scopus: A new approach to scientific visibility from the standpoint of access” shows a new approach to scientific visibility from a systematic combination of four databases: Scopus, the Directory of Open Access Journals, Rights Metadata for Open Archiving. The study shows a new approach to scientific visibility from a systematic combination of four databases: Scopus, the Directory of Open Access Journals, Rights Metadata for Open Archiving.

The abstract reads: “The last few years have seen the emergence of several open access (OA) options in scholarly communication, which can be grouped broadly into two areas referred to as gold and green roads. Several recent studies have shown how large the extent of OA is, but there have been few studies showing the impact of OA in the visibility of journals covering all scientific fields and geographical regions.This research presents a series of informative analyses providing a broad overview of the degree of proliferation of OA journals in a data sample of about 17,000 active journals indexed in Scopus. This study shows a new approach to scientific visibility from a systematic combination of four databases: Scopus, the Directory of Open Access Journals, Rights Metadata for Open Archiving (RoMEO)/Securing a hybrid Environment for Research Preservation and Access (SHERPA), and SciMago Journal Rank] and provides an overall, global view of journals according to their formal OA status. The results primarily relate to the number of journals, not to the number of documents published in these journals, and show that in all the disciplinary groups, the presence of green road journals widely surpasses the percentage
of gold road publications. The peripheral and emerging regions have greater proportions of gold road journals. These journals belong for the most part to the last quartile. The benefits of OA on visibility of the journals are to be found on the green route, but paradoxically, this advantage is not lent by the OA, per se, but rather by the quality of the articles/journals themselves regardless of their mode of access.”

Got access? Read it here.

Do open access biomedical journals benefit smaller countries?


Published in the latest issue of Health Information & Libraries Journal (June 2011), 28 (2), pg. 143-147
Nana Turk wonders if open access publishing provides a solution for scientists from smaller countries who have problems gaining visibility for their research.

The abstract reads:
“Scientists from smaller countries have problems gaining visibility for their research. Does open access publishing provide a solution? Slovenia is a small country with around 5000 medical doctors, 1300 dentists and 1000 pharmacists. A search of Slovenia’s Bibliographic database was carried out to identity all biomedical journals and those which are open access. Slovenia has 18 medical open access journals, but none has an impact factor and only 10 are indexed by Slovenian and international bibliographic databases. The visibility and quality of medical papers is poor. The solution might be to reduce the number of journals and encourage Slovenian scientists to publish their best articles in them.”

Seems that we are quite there yet…

Read the article here.