Screen capture of the Cover of "Stop the Presses"Scholars may be embracing the digital environment. Does that mean that they are making the transition for scholarly monographs from the print-only to e-only?

“Stop the Presses: Is the monograph headed toward an e-only future?” is an Ithaka Report written by Roger Schonfeld exploring the challenges and possibilities.

Interested in reading it? Go to http://www.sr.ithaka.org/blog-individual/stop-presses-monograph-headed-toward-e-only-future

Jane on April 4th, 2013

RESC Blog

You may have noticed that I have been AWOL for a bit. It isnt because i haven’t been blogging.. It is just that I am blogging with my team:

Visit the Research Enterprise & Scholarly Communication Blog Spot: http://lib-resc.blogspot.ca/

And Come check me out!

“Disseminating knowledge was once a costly undertaking. The expenses of printing, distributing, and housing the work of researchers and scholars left most research in the hands of publishers, journals, and institutions in a system that has evolved over centuries. And the licensing model that has arisen with that system butts heads with the quick, simple, and virtually free distribution system of the net.

The key to breaking free of the traditional licensing model locking up research is the promise of the “Open Access” movement. And the movement has already made significant strides. Over the summer the United Kingdom was enticed enough by the potential for greater innovation and growth of knowledge to propose Open Access for any research supported by government funds.

But Open Access still remains a wonky, hard to understand subject.

Today, Peter Suber — Director of the Harvard Open Access Project — shares insights with David Weinberger from his new guide to distilling Open Access, called simply Open Access.”

Go to the MediaBerkman blog to read this post, to listen or download to interview

Elliot Harmon, June 29th, 2012

“In their excellent Washington Post opinion piece, Matt Cooper and Elizabeth Wiley suggest that federally funded research should be freely accessible over the Internet. They argue that when students lose their access to academic databases after graduation, society doesn’t get the same benefits it could from that research:….
http://creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/33156

Jane on July 4th, 2012

The UK Joint Information Systems Committee and the British Library have just released a major (17,00 student) study of the behaviors and beliefs of “Generation Y” (eg born 1983-1992) doctoral students involving social media, information access, and related matters.

The entire report is interesting and I recommend you check out the following tables and figures:

Responses to statements about open access (page 26)
and
Attitude of (main) doctoral supervisor to openness and sharing in research (page 51)

The report is available at:

http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/reports/2012/researchers-of-tomorrow.aspx